News Releases

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Media Contact: Elizabeth C. Martinez
Media Morphosis Phone: (956) 821-8662

PRIME showcases research on Micro-Businesses

(EDINBURG, TX – October 6, 2010) – The Women’s Business Center (WBC), a non-profit organization that offers small business counseling, recently supported the unveiling of the first research done by the Program for Investment in Micro-Entrepreneurs (PRIME).

On September 28, the WBC hosted an event that showcased the research findings by the University of Texas-Pan American’s Sociology professor Dr. Chad Richardson titled, “The Best Practices of Micro-Enterprises.”

His research was presented to over 60 people in attendance and he explained, with the help of UTPA master’s student Amelia Flores, the findings from their research on micro-enterprises predominately found in colonias and other low-income areas in Hidalgo County.

“What we did was go out into the community and talk in-depth with these micro-business owners and find out what their struggles and obstacles were,” Richardson explained. “We also examined how successful their business was and what methods they were using to operate their business.”

In the summer of 2010, 300 small business owners were surveyed. Some of the areas of business included food/snacks (example: raspa stands), automobile, cosmetics/beauty, parties/special occasions, personal care, and construction to name a few. Nearly 30 percent of those interviewed were between 40-49 years old, 25 percent were 50-59 years old, 23 percent were 30-39 years old, 15 percent were 18-29 years old, and less than 5 percent were 60 and older.

As a result of Richardson’s study, he found that the financial situation stayed the same compared to last year for nearly 50 percent of the businesses surveyed. However, it has gotten worse for those who have businesses in bakery and pastries, landscaping and yard, fixed location sales, construction, personal care and skill trade — while the businesses that have improved financially are the ones that own parties or special occasion businesses, food and snacks, cosmetics and beauty and clothing and garment.

Another very important finding on Richardson’s study was the annual income on all those businesses, which was between $12,000 and $42,000.

“The findings had very unique character characteristics of the small businesses in the Rio Grande Valley,” said Maria Mann, WBC director. “The event was very educational, productive, an eye opener, and enlightening.”

Some of Richardson’s recommendations based on his findings include, Initiate a pilot project to make “promotoras” available to assist very small business owners in managing regulations and knowing the keys to success in starting a new business (or developing an existing one); help undocumented business owners become as legal as possible in operating their businesses; help individuals planning very small businesses to adequately plan their business and to adopt minimal bookkeeping and planning; encourage national and state agencies that work with very small businesses to develop training and forms that more successfully accommodate very small business owners with limited education and English proficiency; and encourage banks and other agencies to make available more micro-lending opportunities to very small businesses in the Valley.

For a full report on “The Best Practices of Micro-Enterprises,” please contact the Women’s Business Center at (956) 618-2828.

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Media Contact: Elizabeth C. Martinez
Media Morphosis Phone: (956) 821-8662

WOMEN-OWNED SMALL BUSINESS (WOSB) FEDERAL CONTRACT PROGRAM

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

When Does the WOSB Program Start?

The WOSBFCP will officially start one hundred and twenty days (120) from October 7, 2010.

Who Administers the WOSB Program?

The Small Business Administration (SBA) is charged with implementing and administering the program. This means that SBA publishes regulations that provide the framework for the program, conducts eligibility examinations of WOSB and EDWOSBs, decides protests, conducts studies to determine eligible industries, and works with other Federal agencies in assisting WOSBs and EDWOSBs.

What Are the Laws that Govern the WOSB Program?

On December 21, 2000, Congress enacted the Small Business Reauthorization Act of 2000, Public Law 106-554. Section 811 of that Act added a new section 8(m), 15 U.S.C. 637(m), authorizing Federal contracting officers to restrict competition to eligible Women-Owned Small Businesses (WOSBs) or Economically Disadvantaged Women-Owned Small Business (EDWOSBs) for Federal contracts in certain industries.

What Is the Purpose of the WOSB Program?

The purpose of the WOSBFCP is to enable contracting officers to identify and establish a sheltered market for competition among WOSBs or EDWOSBs for the provision of goods and services to the Federal Government. Restricting competition to WOSBs and EDWOSBs increases their success to compete for and win federal contracts. The program also ensures a level playing field on which such small businesses can compete for Federal contracting opportunities.

How Does my Firm Qualify as a WOSB or EDWOSB?

Qualification as a WOSB To qualify as a WOSB, a concern must be: a small business not less than 51 percent unconditionally and directly owned and controlled by one or more women who are United States citizens.

Qualification as an EDWOSB An eligible business must be not less than 51 percent owned by one or more women who are “economically disadvantaged” (i.e. an EDWOSB). However, SBA may waive this requirement of economic disadvantage for industries in which WOSBs are “substantially underrepresented.” The ownership of the business must be direct as defined in (13 CFR 127.201(b) Requirement for unconditional ownership.

Ownership of a limited liability company

In the case of a concern that is a limited liability company, at least 51 percent of each class of member interest must be unconditionally owned by one or more women or in the case of an EDWOSB, economically disadvantaged women.

Ownership of a corporation

In the case of a concern that is a corporation, at least 51 percent of each class of voting stock outstanding and 51 percent of the aggregate of all stock outstanding must be unconditionally owned by one or more women, or in the case of an EDWOSB, economically disadvantaged women. In determining unconditional ownership of the concern, any unexercised stock options or similar agreements held by a woman will be disregarded. However, any unexercised stock option or other agreement, including the right to convert non-voting stock or debentures into voting stock, held by any other individual or entity will be treated as having been exercised.

Control of an EDWOSB or WOSB

To qualify as a WOSB, the management and daily business operations of the concern must be controlled by one or more women. To qualify as an EDWOSB, the management and daily business operations of the concern must be controlled by one or more women who are economically disadvantaged. Control by one or more women or economically disadvantaged women means that both the long-term decision making and the day-to-day management and administration of the business operations must be conducted by one or more women or economically disadvantaged women.

(a) Managerial position and experience. A woman, or in the case of an EDWOSB an economically disadvantaged woman, must hold the highest officer position in the concern and must have managerial experience of the extent and complexity needed to run the concern. The woman or economically disadvantaged woman manager need not have the technical expertise or possess the required license to be found to control the concern if she can demonstrate that she has ultimate managerial and supervisory control over those who possess the required licenses or technical expertise. However, if a man possesses the required license and has an equity interest in the concern, he may be found to control the concern.

(b) Limitation on outside employment. The woman or economically disadvantaged woman who holds the highest officer position of the concern must manage it on a full-time basis and devote full-time to the business concern during the normal working hours of business concerns in the same or similar line of business. The woman or economically disadvantaged woman who holds the highest officer position may not engage in outside employment that prevents her from devoting sufficient time and attention to the daily affairs of the concern to control its management and daily business operations.

Control over a partnership

In the case of a partnership, one or more women, or in the case of an EDWOSB, economically disadvantaged women, must serve as general partners, with control over all partnership decisions.

Control over a limited liability company

In the case of a limited liability company, one or more women, or in the case of an EDWOSB, economically disadvantaged women, must serve as management members, with control over all decisions of the limited liability company.

Control over a corporation

One or more women, or in the case of an EDWOSB, economically disadvantaged women, must control the Board of Directors of the concern. Women or economically disadvantaged women are considered to control the Board of Directors when either:

(1) One or more women or economically disadvantaged women own at least 51 percent of all voting stock of the concern, are on the Board of Directors and have the percentage of voting stock necessary to overcome any super majority voting requirements; or

(2) Women or economically disadvantaged women comprise the majority of voting directors through actual numbers or, where permitted by state law, through weighted voting.

Involvement in the concern by other individuals or entities. Men or other entities may be involved in the management of the concern and may be stockholders, partners or limited liability members of the concern. However, no males or other entity may exercise actual control or have the power to control the concern.

What Does It Mean To Be Economically Disadvantaged?

In order to be considered economically disadvantaged, your personal net worth must be less than $750,000, excluding your ownership interest in your business and your equity interest in your primary personal residence. Also, a woman is economically disadvantaged if she can demonstrate that her ability to compete in the free enterprise system has been impaired due to diminished capital and credit opportunities as compared to others in the same or similar line of business.

What Criteria Enables Contracting Officers to Restrict or Set-Aside Contracts for WOSBs?

In order to restrict or set-aside contracts for WOSBs or EDWOSBs, the contracting officer must:

• A contracting officer may restrict competition in industries where SBA has determined that WOSBs or EDWOSBs are underrepresented or substantially underrepresented in Federal procurement, as specified in §127.501. Based upon analysis, SBA will designate by NAICS Industry Subsector Code industries where WOSBs are underrepresented and substantially underrepresented.

• Have a reasonable expectation that two or more EDWOSBs or WOSBs will submit offers for the contract;

• The contract award price must not exceed $5 million in the case of manufacturing contracts and $3 million in the case of all other contracts;

• The contract can be awarded at a fair and reasonable price; and

Where Can I Find the List of Eligible Industry Codes?

A complete listing of the Eligible Industry Codes for the WOSBFCP can be found on the SBA’s WOSBFCP web page http://www.sba.gov/wosb. You may also contact the SBA’s Office of Government Contracting Area Offices or the District Offices to obtain a list of eligible Industry Codes.

Am I Required to Self-Certify As a WOSB?

WOSBs and EDWOSBs must self-certify their status in the Central Contractor Registration (CCR) and the On-Line Representations and Certifications Application (ORCA) as other small businesses do. WOSBs and EDWOSBs must also submit documents to the WOSB Program Repository. If the Repository is unavailable, documents must be submitted to the Contracting Officer if the WOSB or EDWOSB is selected as the apparent successful offeror. If someone falsely self certifies, misrepresents its status as an WOSB or EDWOSB or provides false information to the Government, the SBA or another Federal agency may propose to suspend and debar you pursuant to the procedures set forth in the FAR, 48 CFR 9.4. In addition, other penalties for criminal activities may be imposed.

What is the WOSB Program Repository?

The WOSB Program Repository is a document repository maintained by SBA to house the documents submitted by EDWOSBs and WOSBs that would verify the concern’s eligibility, to include copies of Third Party Certifications. The WOSB Repository is a secure, web-based environment that is accessible to the WOSB and EDWOSB, the contracting officer community and SBA. The contracting officer will be able to access the documents prior to contract award to review the submitted documents.

What Are Eligibility Examinations?

An eligibility examination is the formal process through which SBA verifies the accuracy of any certification made or information provided as part of the certification process or in connection with an EDWOSB or WOSB contract. An eligibility examination can be conducted at any time and is not tied to a particular solicitation or contract award. The statute also gives SBA the authority to conduct random eligibility examinations of WOSBs and EDWOSBs to minimize fraud and abuse.

How will I know when I am subject to an eligibility examination?

SBA will notify you within 5 business days before commencing an examination. However, SBA may conduct a site visit without prior notification.

How long can my company participate in the WOSB Program?

There is no term limit on program participation like there is in the 8(a) BD Program. You can receive WOSB Program contracts as long as you are eligible for the program and have met all of the requirements set forth in the regulations.

What is a protest?

An EDWOSB or WOSB status protest is a challenge to eligibility status of the EDWOSB or WOSB concern in connection with a specific EDWOSB or WOSB requirement or contract.

Where do I file a protest?

You can file a protest with the contracting officer in person, by facsimile, by express delivery service, email, or by U.S. mail (received by the applicable date). The contracting officer or SBA must file the protest directly with the Director, Office of Government Contracting.

Who Do I Contact For Assistance With the WOSB Program?

For assistance with the WOSBFCP, you may contact the SBA Answer Desk at:

1-800-U-ASK-SBA (1-800-827-5722) Answer Desk TTY: (704) 344-6640 [Spanish]

For specific questions about WOSB set aside contracts, you may contact the Federal agency contracting officer that is responsible for the contract and/or named in the contract documents.

You may also visit SBA’s WOSB Federal Contract Program web page at http://www.sba.gov/wosb for more information about the program.

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_____________________________________________________________________________________ FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Media Contact: Elizabeth C. Martinez
Media Morphosis Phone: (956) 821-8662
U.S. Small Business Administration
Washington, DC 20416
Office of Government Contracting
October 2010.

FACT SHEET

Women‐Owned Small Business (WOSB) Program

The Small Business Act authorizes contracting officers to specifically limit, or set aside, certain requirements for competition solely amongst women‐owned small businesses (WOSBs) or economically disadvantaged women‐owned small businesses (EDWOSBs). This is referred to as the WOSB Program. These procurement mechanisms are meant to increase Federal contracting opportunities for WOSBs and to assist agencies in achieving their women‐owned small business goals. These procedures are implemented in SBA’s regulations, which can be found at 13 C.F.R. part 127. Although the SBA has issued a final rule on the WOSB program, the rule will not be effective for several months. In the interim, the SBA can work with the Federal Acquisition Regulatory Council and others in implementing the rule in the Federal Acquisition Regulations (FAR) and contracting systems.

This fact sheet provides a basic overview of the program. The SBA intends to issue a Small Business Compliance Guide that will provide more detailed information about the program.

Economically Disadvantaged Women‐Owned Small Business

An Economically Disadvantaged Women‐Owned Small Business (EDWOSB) is a small business concern that is at least 51 percent directly and unconditionally owned and controlled by one or more women who are citizens (born or naturalized) of the United States and who are economically disadvantaged. The EDWOSB automatically qualifies as a women‐owned small business eligible for the WOSB Program.

A woman is presumed economically disadvantaged if she has a personal net worth of less than $750,000, her adjusted gross yearly income averaged over the three years preceding the certification does not exceed $350,000, and the fair market value of all her assets (including her primary residence and the value of the business concern) does not exceed $6 million.

Women‐Owned Small Business

A Women‐Owned Small Business (WOSB) is a small business concern that is at least 51 percent directly and unconditionally owned and controlled by one or more women who are citizens (born or naturalized) of the United States.

Eligibility Requirements

To qualify as an EDWOSB or WOSB, the 51 percent ownership must be unconditional and direct. In addition, the management and daily business operations of the concern must be controlled by one or more economically disadvantaged women (for EDWOSBs) or women (for WOSBs). Control means that both the long‐term decision making and the day‐to‐day management and administration of the business operations must be conducted by one or more economically disadvantaged women (for EDWOSBs) or women (for WOSBs). Further, for EDWOSBs, the economically disadvantaged woman must hold the highest officer position, manage it on a full‐time basis, and devote full‐time to the business concern during the normal working hours of the business concern in the same or similar line of business. For WOSBs, the woman must hold the highest officer position, manage it on a full‐time basis, and devote full‐time to the business concern during the normal working hours of the business concern in the same or similar line of business.

In addition, the woman who holds the highest officer position may not engage in outside employment that prevents her from devoting sufficient time and attention to the daily affairs of the concern to control its management and daily business operations. Although, the woman manager need not have the technical expertise or license required, she must nonetheless demonstrate that she has the ultimate managerial and supervisory control over those who possess the required licenses or technical expertise.

Certification

A WOSB or EDWOSB must: (1) be certified by a Federal agency, a State government, or a national certifying entity approved by the Administrator, as a small business concern owned and controlled by one or more women (referred to as a Third Party Certifier); or, (2) certify to the contracting officer that it is a small business concern owned and controlled by women and provide adequate documentation, in accordance with standards established by SBA, to support such certification.

Self‐ Certification

WOSBs and EDWOSBs will self‐certify their status in the Central Contractor Registration (CCR) and the Online Representations and Certifications Application (ORCA) as other small businesses do.

WOSB or EDWOSB will also be required to post certain documents to the WOSB Program Repository.

Third‐Party Certification

The WOSB or EDWOSB may be certified by an SBA approved Third Party Certifier. The SBA will accept certifications from the U.S. Department of Transportation’s (DOT) Disadavantaged Business Enterprise (DBE) Program, or by SBA as an 8a) Participant. A copy of the third‐party Certification must be provided to the WOSB Program Repository.

Eligible Industry Codes

There are eighty‐three NAICS codes designated as eligible for Federal contracting under the WOSB Program. There are forty‐five NAICS codes in which WOSBs are underrepresented and thirty‐eight NAICS codes in which WOSBs are substantially underrepresented. A complete listing of these codes can be found in the WOSB Federal Contract Program regulations which are available on the U.S. Small Business Administration’s (SBA) website www.sba.gov/wosb.

Responsibilities of the Contracting Officer

Contracting officers may set aside solicitations to allow only EDWOSBs or WOSBs to compete. A contracting officer may set aside a requirement for WOSBs if:

• The North American Industry Classification Systems (NAICS) code assigned to the solicitation, invitation for bid, or quote is in an industry in which SBA has designated that WOSBs are substantially underrepresented.

• The contracting officer has a reasonable expectation that two or more WOSBs will submit offers. This is sometimes referred to as the “rule of two.”

• The anticipated award price of the contract does not exceed $5 million in the case of manufacturing contracts and $3 million in the case of all other contracts.

• In the estimation of the contracting officer, the contract can be awarded at a fair and reasonable price.

A contracting officer may set aside a requirement for EDWOSBs if:

• The NAICS code assigned to the solicitation, invitation for bid, or quote is in an industry in which SBA has designated that WOSBs are underrepresented.

• The contracting officer has a reasonable expectation that two or more EDWOSBs will submit offers. This is sometimes referred to as the “rule of two.”

• The anticipated award price of the contract does not exceed $5 million in the case of manufacturing contracts and $3 million in the case of all other contracts.

• In the estimation of the contracting officer, the contract can be awarded at a fair and reasonable price.

Additional information about the WOSB Program can be obtained by calling 1‐800‐U‐ASK‐SBA or visiting the website at www.sba.gov/wosb -end- _____________________________________________________________________________________ FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Media Contact: Elizabeth C. Martinez
Media Morphosis Phone: (956) 821-8662

Research Reveals Best Practices For Micro-Businesses

EDINBURG, TX (September 22, 2010) – On September 28, Dr. Chad Richardson, principal investigator and sociology professor at the University of Texas-Pan American, will revel his findings from a study conducted on micro-businesses in the Rio Grande Valley.  The event will be held at the Women’s Business Center located at 2852 W. Trenton Rd. in Edinburg from 8:30 a.m. – 12 p.m.

Richardson’s research, “Best practices for Micro-Businesses,” was conducted through Southwest Community Investment Corporation’s Program for Investment in Micro-Enterprises (PRIME). His findings will provide insight into how micro-enterprises in colonias and low-income areas start-up, manage and grow.

“What we are looking at is what they are doing to be successful while faced with the challenge of being a very small business,” Richardson said. “I was amazed at how many of these businesses have managed to be successful by their own standards without government assistance, training, or much start-up capital.”

PRIME Director Jose Leal said, “Despite their smaller size, micro-businesses play a vital role in the overall economy, especially here in the Rio Grande Valley.  And, thanks to the PRIME Program and its findings, micro-entrepreneurs can now equip themselves with the proper ‘tools’ to tackle some of the most difficult challenges that come with being a small business owner.  In short, this is a great Program, and one that was definitely needed here in the Valley.”

Maria Mann, executive director of SCI, added, “This one-of-a-kind research is unique to our border communities and the data obtained is invaluable to better understand the needs and the context of how micro-entrepreneurs do business here in the Valley.

For more information, call (956) 618-2828.

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_________________________________________________________________________________ FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Media Contact: Elizabeth C. Martinez
Media Morphosis Phone: (956) 821-8662

Business Owner Arcilia Acosta Featured Keynote Speaker at Summit Women’s Business Summit geared to growth and leadership

EDINBURG, Texas (April 28, 2010) – Given her extensive experience in the business world, Arcilia Acosta has become a mentor to many and an admired businesswoman. Acosta will be in the Rio Grande Valley on May 7 as the featured keynote speaker at the Women’s Business Summit, which will be held at the Social Club in Edinburg, Texas from 7:30 a.m. – 4 p.m.

Acosta is the president and CEO of CARCON Industries & Construction, specializing in commercial, institutional and transportation construction. Acosta is also the Founder/CEO of Southwestern Testing Laboratories (STL Engineers), geotechnical engineering, construction materials testing and environmental consulting firm based in Dallas.

In 2008, Acosta was appointed to serve on the Board of Directors of Energy Future Holdings Corporation the parent company of TXU Energy, ONCOR Services, and Luminant Corporation. Acosta is the former Chair of the Texas Association of Mexican American Chambers of Commerce, is on the State Board of the Foundation for the Education of Young Women, is past Chair of the Greater Dallas Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, and serves on the boards of the Dallas Foundation and a National Board of Advisors for BBVA/Compass Bank.

As the keynote speaker, Acosta will share with the audience her proven techniques that have helped her become successful in her career. She will also motivate and empower the audience to reach their full potential and obtain their personal and business goals.

Acosta has been awarded the “Texas Hispanic Business Woman of the Year” and received the “National AFLAC Civic Award” in 2007. In May 2008, she was recognized as one of the “Most Influential and Powerful Women in Texas” by Texas Diversity Magazine.

In 2009 Ms. Acosta was awarded the “Texas Diversity First Award” by Texas Diversity Magazine. This same year in July, the Dallas Business Journal named her one of the “Top 25 Women Change Makers”.

The Women’s Business Summit will bring resources to entrepreneurs and aspiring entrepreneurs in the local area. Sponsorship and exhibit opportunities are available. The cost to attend is $25. For more information or to register, call (956) 618-2828.

-end- FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Media Contact: Elizabeth C. Martinez
Media Morphosis Phone: (956) 821-8662

Empowerment is the Focus for The Women’s Business Summit on May 7

EDINBURG, Texas (April 7, 2010) – “Empowering the Entrepreneur in You” is the theme for this year’s Women’s Business Summit, a day-long leadership conference and expo scheduled for Friday, May 7 in Edinburg, Texas. The event is being hosted by the Women’s Business Center, a non-profit organization whose goal is to promote the growth of women-owned businesses in the Rio Grande Valley.

“Today’s modern business woman tackles many challenges on a daily basis. From balancing their career to balancing their family and personal life, women are pulled in many different directions,” said Maria “Charo” Mann, executive director for the Women’s Business Center. “There are many women who dream of becoming a business owner, but something just keeps stopping them from reaching their goal. What they need in order to move forward is to feel that empowerment—and that is why we have chosen the theme ‘Empowering the Entrepreneur in You’ for this upcoming event.”

“We want women to leave The Women’s Business Summit feeling positive and empowered and ready to make their dreams a reality,” Mann added.

The Women’s Business Summit is sending a call out for sponsors who recognize the value of the women-in-business audience. Currently sponsoring the event are ATT, TXU Energy, Lack’s, Verizon, Edinburg Economic Development Corporation and Wells Fargo.

“Women business owners are a growing and very influential segment in the marketplace,” said Mann. “The Women’s Business Summit will be a venue for both women and men to come learn from our speakers, gain access to valuable resources, leave feeling motivated and with great connections.”

The Women’s Business Summit will be held on Friday, May 7, 2010 at the Social Club in Edinburg, Texas from 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. For more information, please call (956) 618-2828 or visit www.wbc-rgv.org.

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  FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Media Contact: Elizabeth C. Martinez
Media Morphosis Phone: (956) 821-8662

The Women’s Business Summit Focuses on Opportunities for Entrepreneurs Empowerment, negotiationare topics to be presented at upcoming event

EDINBURG, Texas (March 17, 2010) – The Women’s Business Center, a non-profit organization whose goal is to promote the growth of women-owned businesses, is hosting The Women’s Business Summit on Friday, May 7, 2010 at the Social Club in Edinburg, Texas from 7:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.

The upcoming Women’s Business Summit will provide a platform for women business owners who are looking to position their enterprises to succeed at the next level. The event will also help aspiring entrepreneurs take the first step to business ownership.

This event is expecting to be a very exciting event especially for those women who are taking that first step towards achieving their entrepreneurial goals.

“The summit is geared towards women entrepreneurs right here in the Rio Grande Valley and is intended as a venue to educate them as to the latest developments in the small business arena,” said Women’s Business Center Executive Director Maria “Charo” Mann. “We’re expecting around 300 small business owners to attend this event and at this time we have already secured the commitment from U.S. Congressman Rubén Hinojosa, State Representative Veronica Gonzalez and U.S. Small Business Administration’s Assistant Administrator for Women’s Business Ownership Ana Harvey.”

The highlight of the summit will be the keynote speaker Maria Marin, an internationally recognized leader in personal motivation for women. She was named one of the “50 Most Influential Women in Radio” in 2009 and Latina Woman of the Year 2008 by National Latina Business Women Association. Marin will present her motivational discourse on “Personal Empowerment” and “The Art of Negotiation.”

The Women’s Business Summit also includes an exhibit area and expert presenters who will speak on the topics of leadership, innovation, job creations, access to capital, procurement, and marketing.

The Women’s Business Summit will bring resources to entrepreneurs and aspiring entrepreneurs in the local area. Sponsorship and exhibit opportunities are available. The cost to attend is $25. For more information or to register, call (956) 618-2828.

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